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Home Blood Pressure Monitors May Be Inaccurate

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Home Blood Pressure Monitors May Be Inaccurate

Researchers says patients should have monitors validated

Home blood pressure monitors may be inaccurate in up to 15 percent of patients, according to new research.

Guidelines suggest patients with high blood pressure use home blood pressure monitors to help with treatment of their disease, but information about real-world accuracy of these monitors is sketchy.

Researchers led by Swapnil Hiremath, M.D., of Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa (Canada), compared measurements from home blood pressure monitors with validated mercury sphygmomanometers used in doctors’ offices in 210 patients.

The investigators found that 63 of 210 of the home monitor systolic blood pressure readings were > 5 mm Hg different and 16 were > 10 mm Hg different from the mercury systolic blood pressure measurement. For diastolic blood pressure, these readings were 67 of 210 and 18 of 210 respectively.

“Home blood pressure monitors may be inaccurate in 5 percent to 15 percent of patients,” Dr. Hiremath says. “We recommend all patients with home monitors get them validated with their health-care providers at least once.”

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BHM Edit Staff